Twitter Paid $322,420 To Security Researchers in Its 'HackerOne' Bug Bounty Programme
Twitter Paid $322,420 To Security Researchers in Its 'HackerOne' Bug Bounty Programme

Micro blogging site Twitter has paid $322,420 to researchers and bug hunters under its “HackerOne” program. In a bid to keep Twitter free from vulnerabilities, the company has paid $322,420 to 1,662 researchers under the bug bounty programme.

Twitter Paid $322,420 To Security Researchers in Its ‘HackerOne’ Bug Bounty Programme

Bug Bounty is a reward provided by an organisation to any person who reports bugs in their software or websites. The reward for reporting the bug depends upon the extremity of the reported vulnerability.

Also Read: 25 Year Old Hacker Earned $80,000 in 8 Months as a ‘bug bounty hunter’

“We maintain a secure development lifecycle that includes secure development training to everyone that ships code, security review processes, hardened security libraries and robust testing through internal and external services — all to maximise the security we provide to our users,” Arkadiy Tetelman, software engineer at Twitter, stated in a blog post on Friday.

The company announced that in the past two years, it received about 5,171 bug submissions from 1,662 researchers and the company has paid a total sum of $322,420 in rewards. The average amount was $835 while as the highest amount was $12,040. However, the minimum threshold to get the bounty amount is $140. Last year, a sole researcher was rewarded more than $54,000 for reporting the vulnerabilities.

Twitter’s bug bounty programme was started in 2014, the company hired HackerOne to manage its bug bounty program. The company wants security researchers to find vulnerabilities relating with remote code execution, authentication issues, cross site scripting, cross site request forgery, etc.

Twitter is not the only company that is offering bug bounty program, companies like Google, Facebook also have the same reward program for researchers. Google disclosed that it has paid more than $6 million to the security researchers in past six years.

Facebook started its bug bounty program in 2011, it has paid over $3 million since its launch, $1.3 million was awarded to 321 researchers in 2014. The company also said that the average amount awarded was $1,788.