Indian Engineering Student Builds a Real-Life Iron Man suit for just $750
Indian Engineering Student Builds a Real-Life Iron Man suit for just $750

Do you love Iron Man series? If yes then you must be a huge fan of Tony Stark! However, have you ever thought of making a real-life iron man suit? Actually, Vimal Govin Manikandan and Indian student certainly did.

Indian Engineering Student Builds a Real-Life Iron Man suit for just $750

Vimal Govin Manikandan is a young Indian engineering student of MES College of Engineering in Kerala. He has built a battery-powered real life Ironman suit using an exoskeleton technology.

Lets know what Exoskeleton technology is? It is a wearable mobile machine that is powered by a system of motors, pneumatics, levers, hydraulics or a combination of technologies that allow for limb movement, increased strength, and endurance.

Vimal Govin Manikandan new suit weighs around 100KG and it can lift up to 150KG with the help of battery-powered pressurised air chambers. However, due to heavy weight, it can’t fly and can hardly walk. However, Vimal and his team managed to develop a unique way to control a robotic suit.

When Vimal Govin Manikandan was asked about the inspiration to build this kind of suit. He said that he was highly inspired by some Hollywood movies like Avatar and Avengers which shows machines that are specially designed for military use.

Vimal Govin Manikandan has cleared his all motives behind creating this type of suit he says that he don’t have any plans to turn himself into a superhero and even said that the suit may turn to be very useful mainly in defence.

Vimal said “Actually the future of this product is mainly in defence, industrial weight lifting, material handling etc,” However, this was not his first exoskeleton suit. Vimal and his team managed to build their first prototype in 2015, which was much larger compared to the new one and was mechanically-powered.

It took just $750 to make this impressive exoskeleton suit. However, as we already mentioned this suit was powered by batteries, the chance that it lasts long is questionable. Vimal and his team are working hard to improve the prototype especially to fix its walking ability.