FIR Registered Against The Manufacturers of World's Cheapest Smartphone, Ringing Bells
FIR Registered Against The Manufacturers of World's Cheapest Smartphone, Ringing Bells

World’s Cheapest smartphone, Freedom 251 was launched nearly two months ago in Indian Capital, New Delhi. It reportedly came with a price tag of $3.6 (R.s 251 INR). However, the company is in legal trouble since it came to light.

FIR Registered Against The Manufacturers of World’s Cheapest Smartphone, Ringing Bells

The FIR was registered against Ringing Bells when the complaint was lodged by Indian Politician, Kirit Somaiya and he labelled Ringing Bells as ponzi bogus company scam. The Noida Police registered the FIR under Section 420 (Cheating) of Indian Penal Code (IPC) and IT act on Tuesday. The company’s president and owner’s name have been mentioned in the FIR, says Police.

Also Read: 5 Reasons That Prove Freedom 251 is a Big Scam

According to Indian Politician, Somaiya “It is not possible to make a smartphone with a price tag or R.s 251 INR and the company owner was duping the people”.

Police said that it has asked the company to submit the documents required for investigation.

The Freedom 251 smartphone was spotted using Adcoms brand name which the Ringing Bells had blemished with whitener.

Last Month, Indian Telecom Minister, Ravi Shankar Prasad said that it will take action against Ringing Bells if it fails to deliver R.s 251 smartphones.

Earlier this month, Adcom threatened to take legal action against the makers of world’s cheapest smartphone, Ringing Bells if in case it affects their brand name or the losses they suffer.

Since the launch of Freedom 251, the company has been badly criticized over different issues. The company claimed to have received over 7 Million Registrations for Freedom 251.

Previously, Mobile Industry Body, Indian Cellular Association urged the Telecom Minister, to look about the pricing of this budget smartphone. Indian Cellular Association maintained that this device can’t be sold below $51 (R.s 3500) even after subsidies.